Category: Solar scraps

Saturday, July 10, 2010
Solar prominences shot with the DMK and the coronado PST
On the 13th of June 2010 I shot a few movies of the solar prominences visible through the PST. The image below was created from a stack of 150 images selected from a total of 1500 images (25 seconds of movie at a rate of 60 images per second). The image was stacked and processed using ASTRO II DC.

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Posted by Math on 07/10 at 11:53 PM | (0) Comments | filed in: Solar scraps | Print
Saturday, June 05, 2010
First light for the binoviewer
Today I tested my new binoviewer on the Sun. I directly connected the Baader Maxbright to the Herschel Prism on my 4-inch refractor. I had to use a 1.7 corrector to get into focus. With the 25mm Televue plossls, I achieved a magnification of 70x. My first impression was stunning, what a detail! A glowing green Sun set against a pitch-black background. But what really amazed me was the intricate detail I could see both in the sunspots of active region 1076, as in the area surrounding it. Very clear were the faculae around the whole region.

Below you see an image of the binoviewer. I also shot two pictures of the active region with the Coolpix 4500. However, the live view through the binoviewer/herschel shows much more detail than I can record with my camera.

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Posted by Math on 06/05 at 11:31 AM | (0) Comments | filed in: Equipment | Solar scraps | Print
Wednesday, June 02, 2010
The Sun is a little active again
Hi all,

On Monday the 24th of May I shot a few images of the Sun with my Coolpix 4500 connected to a 32mm Plossl eyepiece. The first image shows a large prominence. The image was shot through the Coronado PST. The second and third image were shot through the Herschel prism, mounted on a 4-inch refractor. The filters used are a Baader Kontinuum filter and a neutral density 3.0 filter, also from Baader.You can click on all three images to enlarge them.

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Posted by Math on 06/02 at 11:41 AM | (0) Comments | filed in: Solar log | Solar scraps | Print
Wednesday, August 13, 2008
First light for the DMK 21AF04 AS
At the moment I'm testing my new camera, the DMK 21AF04 AS. I first tried the camera on the Coronado PST, and I was surprised by the result. The first image is a typical frame I selected from the 1-minute movie I shot from a prominence. The second image shows the stacked (600 frames) and processed version.

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I will inform you about the equipment set-up and the stacking/processing software in the near future. Right now I'm busy reading the software manuals and experimenting with the few movies I recorded. In the end this monochrome camera will be used to shoot detailed images of the Moon, the Sun in combination with the Baader Herschel Prism/Continuum filter and the Sun in H-Alpha with the Coronado PST. I will keep you updated!


Posted by Math on 08/13 at 01:39 PM | (0) Comments | filed in: Solar scraps | Print
Tuesday, June 26, 2007
Mount Doom....
Last week we were walking through the fields in our hometown. As you can see on the image below, about an hour before sunset we were treated on a very special sight, the Sun “touching” the top of a big cloud. The view instantly reminded us of Mount Doom, the big volcano in Mordor (from The Lord of the Rings). Hmmmm….. maybe finally something happening in Landgraaf, Netherlands tongue wink

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Click to enlarge

Posted by Math on 06/26 at 11:16 AM | (1) Comments | filed in: Solar scraps | Print
Friday, August 18, 2006
A quick look at the Sun
In the afternoon the Sun came out for a few minutes, so I quickly got out the 4-inch refractor and the Herschel-Wedge. There was a wonderful active region visible, AR 0904. The umbra looked jet-black against the "Green" Sun. I use the Baader Herschel-Wedge combined with a 3.0 neutral density filter and the Baader Continuum Filter. Simply beautiful. For visual observing of the Sun in white light, I never had any better views than with this fine piece of equipment. The image does not come close to what I really observed, but it should give you an idea. I stacked it from 235 frames from some video-footage I shot with my Canon camcorder. I used Registax for stacking.


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Posted by Math on 08/18 at 05:17 PM | (0) Comments | filed in: Solar scraps | Print
Thursday, July 27, 2006
Observing the Sun from the shade
I have been observing the Sun for over a year now, using the Coronado PST and TAL 100RS (combined with the Baader Herschel Wedge). One of the problems I noticed during all the observing sessions was getting a good view of the Sun while you are sitting in the direct sunlight. I used to put a black T-shirt over my head, but I can tell you, you feel like your head starts to melt within a few minutes.

Two months ago I decided to try a big plate of Styrofoam. I just cut two holes in it with a box cutter, so it fits over the PST and the 4-inch refractor. To be honest, it works perfectly for me. Now I sit much more relaxed behind the eyepiece. The views are much better, and the white Styrofoam keeps of the heat as well. If I want to have a real good view through the PST, I still use the black T-shirt, but because I do not get direct sunlight on my head, this isn’t a problem anymore. My advise for solar-observers: get behind some kind of white plate, and of you are looking in H-alpha, make your surroundings as dark as possible. I personally get much more contrast when I view with the black T-shirt draped over my head and over the telescope.

Here are two images of the telescopes and the Styrofoam plate, and two images (from the first week of June) I shot during that observing session, one with the PST and one with the Herschel-wedge. Click on the images to enlarge!


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Posted by Math on 07/27 at 06:13 AM | (0) Comments | filed in: Solar scraps | Print
Sunday, July 31, 2005
Large prominence
At the moment there is a big prominence visible as well as the active region AR 792. Here are some images from some two hours ago (click to enlarge!)


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Enjoy the images for now. Details on the images will follow within the next few days. I will keep you updated.

Clear skies
Posted by Math on 07/31 at 09:19 AM | (1) Comments | filed in: Solar scraps | Print
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